Mineral Wells Index, Mineral Wells, TX

Z_CNHI News Service

August 23, 2013

EDITORIALS: College spending reform; Manning's not a whistleblower

College spending reform needed

(The Tonawanda News / Tonawanda, N.Y.)

College students and their families should be grateful President Obama elevated an issue that’s pressing pocketbooks across the country into the national discourse. College, whether a two-year or four-year school, is a necessity that is increasingly priced as a luxury, leaving graduates to pay down a mountain of debt just as they take their fist steps into independence and adulthood.

A few statistics: The average four-year college graduate leaves school with $26,000 in debt. The cost of college has risen 250 percent over the last three decades, but the median income has only risen by about 15 percent, making the idea of starting a college fund with a few dollars a week stashed in a piggy bank in a child’s infancy impossible.

And while we’re heartened the president addressed this important issue, some of his proposals miss the mark.

His broadest reform proposal includes instituting new college evaluations conducted by the federal Department of Education. We agree students and parents need a more comprehensive, understandable rubric by which to evaluate schools. As is the case with most education reforms, however, the devil is in the details. Grading colleges’ performance relative to cost and graduates’ success in finding a job is important, but it isn’t the only defining factor in what makes a school the right choice. Most universities specialize in certain fields of study and that can distort the picture.

Take the president’s host, the University at Buffalo, as an example: A student seeking to study medicine or biology would weigh the university more favorably than other schools that don’t have the same renown in that field. A simple analysis of the generic UB student’s post-graduate success, irrespective of discipline, diminishes the school’s appearance and might prompt prospective students to look elsewhere.

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