Mineral Wells Index, Mineral Wells, TX

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January 16, 2013

Sugar intake linked to body weight, study review confirms

LONDON — Increasing or decreasing intake of sugar is associated with changes in body weight, a commonly held view confirmed by the first systematic review of available evidence commissioned by the World Health Organization.

Increased consumption of so-called free sugars, including additives to foods and those naturally present in honey, syrups and fruit juices, led to an average gain of 0.8 kilograms (1.8 pounds) in body weight in adults, researchers at the University of Otago in New Zealand found in a review of 71 studies. Limiting the analysis to studies lasting longer than eight weeks, weight gain was 2.7 kilograms, they said.

The WHO commissioned the review in preparation for updating its 2003 recommendation that free sugar be limited to less than 10 percent of energy intake. The study adds to a debate over public policy aimed at curbing the obesity epidemic and related diseases, including New York City's decision to restrict sales of large-sized sugary soft drinks.

"When considering the rapid weight gain that occurs after an increased intake of sugars, it seems reasonable to conclude that advice relating to sugars intake is a relevant component of a strategy to reduce the high risk of overweight and obesity in most countries," the authors said in a paper published Wednesday in the British Medical Journal.

Cutting consumption of sugars led to an average 0.8 kilogram reduction in weight in adults, according to five studies that ranged from 10 weeks to eight months, the authors said. Among studies in children, comparison of varying levels of consumption suggested a "significantly increased risk" of being overweight associated with higher intakes, they said.

"This review clearly indicates the positive association, which I think is quite striking, given that no such systematic reviews have been conducted so far," Chizuru Nishida, a coordinator in the WHO's Department of Nutrition for Health and Development in Geneva, said in an interview. The study defends the current WHO guidelines that have been criticized as having no scientific basis, she said.

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