Mineral Wells Index, Mineral Wells, TX

Alvis Delk Rock

August 12, 2008

One step at a time

Radiologist agrees: rock’s X-ray images show compression in material

By David May

editor@mineralwellsindex.com

It’s a relatively small step forward, but one thing has become certain about the intersecting footprints contained in a piece of North Texas limestone – they were made by stepping into the rock when it was soft.

At least that’s the opinion of a local radiologist who independently reviewed imagery data of what is steadily becoming a well-known and controversial slab of rock.

“Something compressed that rock,” said Dr. Charles Myers, head of the radiology unit at Palo Pinto General Hospital, who on Thursday reviewed CAT scan images – digital high-tech X-rays – of the stone. “Displacement caused by stepping, I totally agree with that. I think that is conceivable.”

But that is all that can be said at this point with any certainty.

More questions remain about the rock dubbed the “Alvis Delk Cretaceous Footprint” that depicts a dinosaur stepping into a human footprint. If genuine, the purported discovery would overturn 150 years of evolutionary and scientific theory that says man and dinosaur did not walk the Earth together.

The Mineral Wells Index was the first news organization to report on the stone in its July 27 edition two weeks ago. The approximately 2-foot by 3-foot limestone was reportedly found eight years ago by former Mineral Wells resident and amateur archeologist Alvis Delk, who now lives in Stephenville, Texas, and his friend James Bishop, also of Stephenville, when they were fossil and Indian artifact hunting along a creek off the Paluxy River near Glen Rose, Texas.

Delk said at the time they saw only the dinosaur print. They carried the estimated 140-pound stone away, and Delk took it home and left it virtually untouched until this past May when he said he pulled it out, began brushing it, and saw the human print appear, and saw that the dinosaur print intruded over and into the human print.

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Alvis Delk Rock
  • Carl Baugh lecturing One step at a time It’s a relatively small step forward, but one thing has become certain about the intersecting footprints contained in a piece of North Texas limestone – they were made by stepping into the rock when it was soft.

    August 12, 2008 3 Photos

  • Dinosaur print Rock-solid proof? A slab of North Texas limestone is on track to rock the world, with its two imbedded footprints poised to make a huge impression in scientific and religious circles.

    August 12, 2008 3 Photos

  • images_sizedimage_225091257 Rock's finders discovering celebrity not always pleasant Sometimes when you step into a spotlight, it can shine too bright.

    August 12, 2008 2 Photos

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