Mineral Wells Index, Mineral Wells, TX

Alvis Delk Rock

August 12, 2008

Rock's finders discovering celebrity not always pleasant

By David May

editor@mineralwellsindex.com

Sometimes when you step into a spotlight, it can shine too bright.

That is what James Bishop is learning, and might explain his initial reluctance to be associated with what is being hailed as the “Alvis Delk Cretaceous Footprint” discovery.

Amateur archeologists and experienced Indian artifacts hunters Alvis Delk, 72, a former Mineral Wells resident who now resides in Stephenville, Texas, and Bishop, 70, also of Stephenville, were reportedly on one their hunts in July 2000 when Delk came across a large piece of limestone alongside a creek off the Paluxy River near Glen Rose, Texas.

Delk saw a dinosaur track in the stone, so he and Bishop carried it off. Delk said he placed the stone off to the side and essentially ignored it for eight years, when this past May he brushed it and uncovered a human footprint in the stone. More than that, the prints indicate the human print was made first, and the dinosaur print second, with the dinosaur print stepping and intruding into the human print.

If genuine, the stone would overturn virtually all conventional scientific thinking and theories that say man and dinosaur did not walk the Earth together, separated in existence by tens of millions of years.

The stone seems to have passed one test - that the prints were not made by etching or carving them into the rock. That, at least, is the contention of the man now in possession of the rock, Carl Baugh of the Creation Evidence Museum, based on CAT scan images made at Glen Rose Medical Facility. Last week, the head of Palo Pinto General Hospital's radiology unit, Dr. Charles Myer, agreed that the scans show the rock's material was compressed when it was soft, leaving the question of - when was it soft?

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Alvis Delk Rock
  • Carl Baugh lecturing One step at a time It’s a relatively small step forward, but one thing has become certain about the intersecting footprints contained in a piece of North Texas limestone – they were made by stepping into the rock when it was soft.

    August 12, 2008 3 Photos

  • Dinosaur print Rock-solid proof? A slab of North Texas limestone is on track to rock the world, with its two imbedded footprints poised to make a huge impression in scientific and religious circles.

    August 12, 2008 3 Photos

  • images_sizedimage_225091257 Rock's finders discovering celebrity not always pleasant Sometimes when you step into a spotlight, it can shine too bright.

    August 12, 2008 2 Photos

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