Mineral Wells Index, Mineral Wells, TX

February 27, 2014

Teddy Roosevelt exhibit coming to Old Jail Museum


— By Barbara Manson



Theodore Roosevelt, our 26th President, often used the word "bully," for at that time in history it carried a different meaning – good, great, exciting. Roosevelt was a bigger-than-life personality who brought many changes to our nation. He was the first President to speak directly to the public utilizing the "Bully Pulpit.” An exhibit organized by the Lyndon Baines



Johnson Presidential Library and Museum, "Theodore Roosevelt," offers a fascinating glimpse into turn-of-the last century America with this dynamic man at the helm. The Theodore Roosevelt Exhibit is offered free for enjoyment by the Palo Pinto County Old Jail Museum and Humanities Texas.

Twenty-two panels focus on the ebullient personality and character of this President, as reflected through his many different kinds of writing. The exhibit also features color and sepia-toned photographs with concise text. Hear President Roosevelt speak to you from his ”Bully Pulpit.

Theodore Roosevelt: President, soldier, conservationist, trust buster, hunter, author, family man and naval strategist. President Roosevelt died Jan. 16, 1919, but had proved that one could overcome weak health to become a vigorous personality who served as soldier, Governor of New York, Secretary of the Navy and President in the short 60 years of his life.

This president loved the out of doors, hunted extensively and during his term as President created our National Park System. When he joined the New York Assembly as a representative from New York City ,1882, he was the youngest member to serve in that position. This achievement comes as no surprise to those who know history for at age 42 he would become the youngest President of the United States.

During Theodore Roosevelt's term as President, sweeping changes were brought about in the powers of the Presidency and our Nation.

Monopolies in the coal, steel and oil industries had what he felt was a strangle hold on the growth of the nation. He became a dedicated prosecutor of those monopolies under the Sherman Antitrust Act. The "Square Deal" was the President’s domestic program to embrace reforms in the workplace, government regulation of industry and consumer protection to help the middle class. During his term he had the Navy create the "Great White Fleet" that sailed around the world as a testament of United States power. The Panama Canal was completed during his term and he stated that the USA would defend the Monroe Doctrine placing our nation as the "Policeman of the World."

Because Theodore Roosevelt was known for his love of hunting, a story was published telling that he had refused to shoot a bear for humanitarian reasons. Cartoons were created showing a small bear and his refusal to shoot. Our free enterprise system found a stuffed animal maker who capitalized on this happening and named his stuffed bear "Teddy Bear."

An American Icon was born.

NEW AT THE OLD JAIL MUSEUM IN PALO PINTO

There is so much that can and should be said about this charismatic President that there would not be room in a this small article. Come and see this exhibit. Don’t be surprised if a Teddy Bear tries to follow you home.

Palo Pinto County Old Jail Museum Complex, March 6, 2014 – March 30, 2014, will present "Theodore Roosevelt," an exhibition produced by Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information about viewing hours or to arrange group visits, contact Ann Reagan at 940-659-2555. The Old Jail Museum is open Thursday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Come out and join us for this interesting informative exhibit at on3e of the best frontier museums, The Palo Pinto County Old Jail Museum, Palo Pinto, Texas.

Humanities Texas develops and supports diverse programs across the state, including lectures, oral history projects, teacher institutes, traveling exhibitions and documentary films. For more information, please visit Humanities Texas online at http://www.humanitiestexas.org or call 512.440.1991.