Mineral Wells Index, Mineral Wells, TX

April 21, 2014

Letters to the Editor - April 20, 2014


Mineral Wells Index

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Dear Editor,

The First Baptist Church youth group of Mineral Wells is hosting its 30-Hour Famine event April 25-27. The Famine is a weekend event where 7th--12th- grade students gather to learn about world hunger, raise money for the cause, have the option to fast from food for 30 hours, and join together to raise awareness for issues in our world including poverty, hunger, and social injustice. The event is sponsored by World Vision, a global, Christian organization who, “are called to serve the neediest people of the earth.”  They help those afflicted by extreme poverty from natural disaster and protect human rights. In addition, World Vision seeks “to facilitate an engagement between the poor and the affluent that opens both to transformation.”  First Baptist Church Youth of Mineral Wells also intends to reach out to both the poor and affluent through 30-Hour Famine.

Some of you may already donate to World Vision, or any other charity of choice, which is fine since the purpose of my argument – and 30 Hour Famine – is to raise funds and teach the unaware about extreme poverty and world hunger. While world hunger may still exist, the apathetic attitude towards the problem must change.

As I write this, many people every minute are dying from starvation. No one should ever die from a lack of food because it is an unnatural death. In fact, one child dies approximately every five seconds from malnourishment. The United Nations has reported a decrease in deaths from malnourishment by approximately 17% between the years 1990 and 2010.

Although the numbers of deaths have decreased, a child should never die from hunger.  Every life is important, and because every life is important, World Vision “gives priority to people before money, structure, systems, and other institutional machinery.”  We should all make helping people a priority as well.

Not only does World Vision provide food and clean water, but they also address the root causes of poverty, injustice, and hunger: education.  Education results in prosperity.  Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” To defeat poverty and hunger, World Vision has taught both mothers and children about nutrition and various other life skills such as gardening and animal husbandry. Imagine the joy on a child’s face to know someone else in the world cares enough about them to provide food, water, and a future.

World hunger may always exist, but that assumption should be irrelevant to my argument.  As I said, every life is important. If World Vision has no money, how do they help the poor and hungry? If no one helps, how will the poor have a future?

I understand some of you may have not considered the issue before, but now you have the opportunity to address the problem. Consider joining the fight against hunger. There are several ways to help. On Saturday, April 26, from 9 a.m. – 12 p.m., the youth group will have a bake sale at Metro Grocery where all the funds raised will be going directly to World Vision. If you cannot attend, you may also give by taking your donation to First Baptist Church or giving online at our youth group’s giving page: http://30hf.worldvision.org/goto/fbcmwtx.  Even if you cannot donate, you can still pray, learn, and raise awareness.  But whatever you do, be anything but apathetic.



Sincerely,

Reece Marr

FBC Youth Member