Mineral Wells Index, Mineral Wells, TX

Veterans Corner

April 22, 2013

Veterans' Corner

Department of Veterans Affairs doctors are continuing to prescribe tranquilizers such as Valium and Xanax to veterans diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder, despite VA guidelines advising against their use for the condition.

Almost a third of veterans being treated for PTSD are prescribed benzodiazepines, a class of sedatives commonly used to treat insomnia, anxiety, seizures and other conditions. Researchers found that benzodiazepine prescriptions by VA doctors for PTSD patients declined from 37 percent to 30 percent between 1999 and 2009, but it remained at 30 percent through 2012.

The VA health care system experienced a huge increase in the number of veterans being treated for PTSD, increasing three-fold in 10 years to about a half-million patients in 2009.

Benzodiazepines have been around since the 1960s when they became the sedative of choice and replaced barbiturates which carried a high risk of overdose and abuse. Benzodiazepines have become the preferred PTSD drug treatment because of their usefulness in managing anxiety and insomnia.

The current clinical practice guidelines for managing PTSD, co-authored by the VA and Department of Defense, caution medical providers against using benzodiazepines due to lack of data and growing evidence for the potential risk of harm. Studies, however, have not shown benzodiazepines as effective treatment for what are called the core PTSD symptoms of avoidance, hyper-arousal, numbing and dissociation. In fact, the drugs may impede other effective treatments for PTSD. Mounting evidence suggests that the long-term harms imposed by benzodiazepine use outweigh any short-term symptomatic benefits in patients with PTSD.

Studies that compared the use of a benzodiazepine called "Alprazolam" and a placebo for alleviating PTSD symptoms find that the slight reduction of anxiety was offset by withdrawal symptoms after only five weeks of use.

The use of benzodiazepines is especially problematic in PTSD patients who also have substance abuse disorders or mild traumatic brain injuries. The DOD/VA guidelines especially caution their use with patients suffering from combat-related PTSD because more than half of such patients abuse alcohol or drugs.

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